Lewis and Clark events across the nation

January through March 2022

Have fun between now and the end of March. Hop on the learning express and attend one of the 21 Lewis and Clark live events and talks. Most talks will be aired on Zoom.

This monthly calendar of Lewis and Clark events throughout the nation is provided by the Lewis and Clark Trail Heritage Foundation. The organization’s mission is to “preserve, promote and teach the diverse heritage of Lewis and Clark for the benefit of all people.” The Trail Heritage Foundation is the nation’s premier non-profit citizens’ organization for the preservation of the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail and the sharing of its stories.

**SAVE THE DATE** A special event: January 22 is Lewis and Clark Virtual Trivia Night, the first ever held by the Lewis and Clark Trail Heritage Foundation. How well do you know Lewis and Clark? Find out. Enjoy while you learn! For details, check out the calendar entry for January 22.

The following details are for events through March. Please visit the calendar on the Lewis and Clark Trail Heritage Foundation website to see if more events become listed during the upcoming month. Unless otherwise noted, all events are free. The next monthly calendar will be published February 1.

January 8 (Saturday): Trevor James Bond, author of a new book, Coming Home to Nez Perce Country: The Niimiipuu Campaign to Repatriate Their Exploited Heritage, and Nakia Williamson, director of the Nez Perce Tribe Cultural Resources Program, will give an illustrated talk and reading from Coming Home to Nez Perce Country. The presentation will be live at 1 p.m. (Pacific Time Zone) at the Lewiston City Library, Lewiston, Idaho. The presentation will also be available at the same time on Zoom. Seating is limited at the live talk; to reserve a seat, call 208-743-2535 or send an email to npccurator@gmail.com. Click here to register for the Zoom presentation.

Nakia Williamson

Nakia Williamson

Coming Home to Nez Perce Country focuses on the reclaiming of Nez Perce artifacts acquired in 1847 by Presbyterian minister Henry Spalding in north-central Idaho. He sent them to a friend and supporter, Dudley Allen, in Ohio in exchange for commodities. Once known as the Spalding-Allen Collection, the artifacts—shirts, dresses, blankets, horse regalia, and more—would not return to their rightful home until the tribe purchased them in 1997 from the Ohio Historical Society for $608,100.

Trevor James Bond

Trevor James Bond

Trevor is co-director of the Center for Digital Scholarship and Curation and associate dean for Digital Initiatives and Special Collections at the Washington State University Libraries. Nakia is an artist and storyteller of historical events. Some of his paintings have chronicled Lewis and Clark’s interactions with the Nez Perce. In late June 2021, Nakia was instrumental in a renaming ceremony that marked the 25th anniversary of the return of the Spalding-Allen Collection to the Nez Perce. During the ceremony, the collection was renamed as the Wetxuuwíitin Collection. The word “Wetxuuwíitin” means “returned home after a period of captivity,” appropriate for items that the tribe had been missing since the mid-1840s.

The presentation is part of the Confluence of History series made possible by the, North Idaho Speakers Bureau, Nez Perce County Historical Society, Lewiston City Library, Idaho Chapter of the Lewis and Clark Trail Heritage Foundation and the Idaho Governors Lewis and Clark Grant of 2019-2021.

January 8 (Saturday): Travelers’ Rest Connection in Lolo, Montana, will host an 11 a.m. (Mountain Time Zone) Zoom talk by elders and staff from the Séliš-Ql̓ispé Culture Committee, who will share traditional stories and reflect on what these stories tell us about tribal culture, history, and the people’s relationship with the land. For more info and to register for this presentation, click here.

January 11 (Tuesday): Austin Haney will present a free program, “The Lost West,” at 7 p.m. (Mountain Time Zone) at the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center in Great Falls, Montana. Haney is a longtime reenactor and researcher specializing in the American and Canadian West. He is an interpreter for the Lewis and Clark Foundation at the center. His program will focus on French history in North America in the years prior to, during, and after the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Haney will chart the rise of Quebec from Champlain to the Plains of Abraham, including pioneers of trade and exploration such as Radisson, Grossielliers, and La Verendrye. He will also cover the lives of the Frenchmen who accompanied the Corps of Discovery. The program will give a glimpse into the rich story of North America’s vanished empire, and the people who made it possible. The program is part of the monthly Ida Johnson Lecture Series, hosted by the Portage Route Chapter of the Lewis and Clark Trail Heritage Foundation. More information about Austin’s program…

John N. Maclean

John N. Maclean

January 15 (Saturday): John N. Maclean will give an 11 a.m. (Mountain Time Zone) Zoom talk about “sense of place” and his newest book: Home Waters: A Chronical of Family and a River, which includes a chapter about Meriwether Lewis’ journey from Travelers’ Rest and along the Road to the Buffalo. John’s talk is hosted by Travelers’ Rest Connection in Lolo, Montana. For more info and to register, click here.

January 22 (Saturday): How well do you know the Lewis & Clark story? Test your historical knowledge during the first Lewis and Clark Trail Heritage Foundation Virtual Trivia Night at 4 p.m. (Mountain Time Zone). The event will be held via Zoom and trivia answers will be submitted via Google Forms. To register, click here. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email with the link to the Zoom meeting and a link to the first Google Form. This form is password protected to prevent players from accessing the trivia questions before the event. If you have any questions, please contact Tori Shaw Clemmons at tshaw@lewisandclark.org or Sarah Cawley at director@lewisandclark.org.

Lauren and Justin Karnopp

Lauren and Justin Karnopp

January 22 (Saturday): Travelers’ Rest Connection in Lolo, Montana, will host an 11 a.m. (Mountain Time Zone) Zoom talk by Lauren and Justin Karnopp, the hosts and producers of The February Room Podcast and owners of CD Fishing USA. Expect to learn about fishing in Montana and some fun stories, and insights on how they started their business. Members of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, as you might remember, often fished and found such endeavors productive and beneficial in maintaining nutrition. For more info and to register, click here.

January 29 (Saturday): The Southern Prairie Chapter of the Lewis and Clark Trail Heritage Foundation will host a talk about Lewis and Clark, the Kaw, Underground Railroad, and Freedom’s Frontier National Heritage Area by Holly and Kristen Zane, members of the Wyandot Nation of Kansas. The lunch meeting will start at 11:30 a.m. (Central Time Zone) at Cascone’s Restaurant, 3733 N. Oak Trafficway, Kansas City, Mo. Southern Prairie members will receive an email about this event. For more information: Dan Sturdevant, dan@sturdevantlawoffice.com. The Southern Prairie Chapter is comprised of members in Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma and Texas.

Hall Stearns

Hall Stearns

January 29 (Saturday): Hal Stearns will give an 11 a.m. (Mountain Time Zone) Zoom talk about larger-than-life leaders in Montana’s history. Hal, an instructor with the University of Montana’s Lifelong Learning Institute and Humanities Montana, will discuss the mix of art and innovation, charisma and communication, and bravado and brashness that is needed in leaders. His talk is hosted by Travelers’ Rest Connection in Lolo, Montana. For more info and to register, click here.

February 5 (Saturday): The 25th annual meeting of the Washington Chapter of the Lewis and Clark Trail Heritage Foundation. The meeting, starting at 10:15 a.m. (Pacific Time Zone), will be in the 5th floor boardroom of the Washington State History Museum, 1911 Pacific Avenue, Tacoma, Wa. The speaker, Robert Heacock, will present a current events discussion on Lower Snake River dams and their effects on salmon and seven Lewis and Clark Expedition campsites now submerged the reservoirs created by the dams. For more info: John Orthmann, privatejwhitehouse@gmail.com.

February 5 (Saturday): The Travelers’ Rest Connection in Lolo, Montana, will host an 11 a.m. (Mountain Time Zone) Zoom talk. However, the topic has not yet been determined. Please click on this link in the future to learn the topic.

February 6-March 19: The traveling exhibit “Reimagining America: The Maps of Lewis and Clark” will be on view at Historic Fort Steuben, Steubenville, Ohio. More info about the exhibit…

Michaela Shifley

Michaela Shifley

February 12 (Saturday): Michaela Shifley, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Montana in Missoula, will give an 11 a.m. (Mountain Time Zone) Zoom presentation on how moccasins made enormous contributions to early exploration and expansion in America. She will discuss these contributions and their particular importance during the Lewis and Clark Expedition. She will also talk about moccasins in museum collections and the important roles that moccasins fulfill for Native communities in today’s world. Michaela’s talk is hosted by Travelers’ Rest Connection in Lolo, Montana. For more info and to register, click here.

February 12 (Saturday): Garry Busch and J.R. Spencer will give a talk about Pomp’s birthday and Nez Perce Incorporation at the Lewiston City Library, Lewiston, Idaho. Zoom available. The 1 p.m. (Pacific Time Zone) talk will also be available via Zoom. The talk is sponsored by the collaboration of North Idaho Speakers Bureau, Nez Perce County Historical Society, Idaho Chapter of the Lewis and Clark Trail Heritage Foundation, and Lewiston City Library. To get the Zoom link, go to the Nez Perce County Historical Society. For questions, send an email to Rob Heacock, heacock1@mindspring.com.

Rose Bear Don't Walk

Rose Bear Don’t Walk

February 19 (Saturday): Learn about recovering our roots—ethnobotany for community wellbeing—in an 11 a.m. (Mountain Time Zone) Zoom talk by Rose Bear Don’t Walk. Rose seeks to bridge science, culture, and health through her work with traditional indigenous foods and native plants of northwest Montana. Her talk is hosted by Travelers’ Rest Connection in Lolo, Montana. For more info and to register, click here.

Helen Piotopowaka Clarke

Helen Piotopowaka Clarke

February 26 (Saturday): Attend an 11 a.m. (Mountain Time Zone) Zoom talk to learn about the extraordinary life of Helen Piotopowaka Clarke(1846–March 4, 1923), a Piegan Blackfeet and Scottish American actress, educator and bureaucrat who pioneered as a mixed-race woman in her fields. She became one of the first women elected to public office in Montana.

Vernon Carroll

Vernon Carroll

The talk will be given by Vernon Carroll, a member of the Blackfeet Tribe, who was born in Cut Bank, Montana, and has a lifelong interest in the history and culture of the native peoples who lived in Montana. He is the retired pioneer interpretive specialist at the Traveler’s Rest State Park in Lolo, Montana. The Travelers’ Rest Connection will host Vernon’s talk. For more info and to register, click here.

Frederick Bates

Frederick Bates

February 27 (Sunday): Shannon Kelly will give a free Zoom presentation about her research on Frederick Bates, who was affiliated in various ways with Lewis and Clark. Bates is usually remembered as Meriwether Lewis’s bitter post-expedition political rival and then as second governor of the state of Missouri. To receive the Zoom link for Shannon’s presentation, please contact Sarah Cawley at director@lewisandclark.org. Shannon’s Zoom talk will start at 4 p.m. (Mountain Time Zone).

What do we actually know about Bates? The documentary record left by him as well as his family, friends, enemies, and people in between give a fascinating look at the man and his influence on early American involvement in the lands of the Louisiana Purchase. Shannon will also give insights on not only Lewis but also Clark and his career. What were Frederick Bates’ relationships with Lewis, Clark, and other expedition members and how did those change over time? Shannon’s findings may not necessarily make Frederick Bates more likable but her research certainly makes him more human.

Shannon Kelly with two of her historic friends: Lewis and Clark

Shannon Kelly with two of her historical friends: Lewis and Clark

Shannon is a longtime member of the Lewis and Clark Trail Heritage Foundation and is involved with outreach and grants. She is the lead interpreter at the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center & Fort Mandan State Historic Site, Washburn, N.D. Shannon plans on publishing her research on Bates in We Proceeded On, the Trail Heritage Foundation’s quarterly magazineOriginally from Idaho, she has traveled most of the Lewis and Clark trail.

March 5 (Saturday): From the first words uttered by our ancestors around a campfire, storytelling has been part of what it means to be human. Attend an 11 a.m. (Mountain Time Zone) Zoom talk by Mary Jane Bradbury to learn about the history (and her story) of storytelling and its ever-increasing role in keeping humanity connected. Mary Jane is an historic interpreter and scholar who brings history to life for audiences of all ages. She is an artist in residence for the C.M. Russell Museum in Great Falls and the Montana Historical Society in Helena. Her talk will be hosted by the Travelers’ Rest Connection in Lolo, Montana. For more info and to register, click here.

March 5 (Saturday): The next meeting of the Oregon Chapter of the Lewis and Clark Trail Heritage Foundation will be the annual Christmas gathering that was postponed due to Covid. The event from noon to 3 p.m. (Pacific Time Zone) will include a lunch ($10 a person) at the Columbia River Discovery Center, Dalles, Oregon. Keith Glueck, a master model builder, will present research on the keelboat and have his model on display. After the lunch, Glen Kirkpatrick, Oregon Chapter president, will give a presentation on the “Columbia River Gorge—Then and Now.” RSVP is required to Thelma Haggenmiller, SlowPokeTours@gmail.com or 503-659-5590). More information will be emailed to members as time gets closer to the event.

March 12 (Saturday):  Lewis and Clark historian Jay Buckley will present The Lewis and Clark Trail through Paintings at the Lewiston City Library, 411 D St., Lewiston, Idaho, and via Zoom. The event is sponsored by the collaboration of North Idaho Speakers Bureau, Nez Perce County Historical Society, Idaho Chapter of the LCTHF, and Lewiston City Library. To get the Zoom link for the 1 p.m. (Pacific Time Zone) presentation, go to the Nez Perce County Historical Society. For questions, send an email to Rob Heacock, heacock1@mindspring.com

Earnest Shackleton and the HMS Endurance

Ernest Shackleton and the HMS Endurance, stuck in ice

March 20 (Sunday): Mark Jordan will give a 4 p.m. (Central Time Zone) Zoom presentation about Ernest Shackleton, who made four expeditions to the Antarctica in the early 1900s, one of which resulted in one of the most incredible survival episodes in the history. On the surface, it may seem that Shackleton is somewhat far afield from Lewis and Clark, but in many ways the endeavors of their explorations were similar. Mark, who was awarded the Lewis and Clark Trail Heritage Foundation Meritorious Achievement Award for bringing the Lewis and Clark Expedition to a broad public, has studied both the Shackleton and Lewis and Clark journeys and will discuss similarities. His main focus, though, will be on Shackleton, one of the great explorers of what’s considered the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration.

Mark Jordan with a statue of Lewis, Clark and Seaman in St. Louis

Mark Jordan with a statue of Lewis, Clark and Seaman in St. Louis

Mark’s lecture will show original photographs from Shackleton’s time and photographs taken by Mark during a recent trip to areas covered by Shackleton. This presentation will be the first of two Zoom lectures that Mark will give about Shackleton (check future L&C calendars for the date of the second lecture). Mark’s presentations are hosted by the Southwest and Southern Prairie regions of the Lewis and Clark Trial Heritage Foundation. To receive the Zoom link for the March 20 presentation, send an email to garykimsey55@gmail.com.

Here’s brief info about Shackleton’s most famous expedition: He and 27 crew members set out in the HMS Endurance in December 1914. Shackleton’s goal was to cross the Antarctic Continent, but, before landing, his ship became locked into the ice and eventually crushed. The men were stranded on the Weddell Sea ice pack, and only barely managed to escape. After landing on the extremely remote Elephant Island, Shackleton left 21 of the men to survive while he and five others made an incredible small-boat journey of 800 miles through monstrous swells, angry winds and freezing temperatures to reach help.

March 26 (Saturday): The Washington Chapter of the Lewis and Clark Trail Heritage Foundation will host a work party to refurbish and paint the Drewyer’s River sign at Lyons Ferry State Park at the confluence of the Snake River and the Palouse River, 620 Marmes Road, near Washtucna, Wa. The event begins at 9 a.m. (Pacific Time Zone). For questions, send an email to Rob Heacock, heacock1@mindspring.com.

Learn about Lewis and Clark:

Whether you are an academic researcher, a student or a fan looking for more information, go to http://lewis-clark.org/ to learn more about the explorers and their times. You can also find the website by typing Discovering Lewis & Clark into your browser.

Operated by the Lewis and Clark Trail Heritage Foundation, the website is the world’s most comprehensive online source of Lewis and Clark information. The website’s home page shows what happened today on the expedition. There are also special features on the website. A current feature focuses on Native nations encountered by the explorers. The website’s “Search” feature will locate whatever topic you want.

How to submit an event to this calendar:

Send information about upcoming events to garykimsey55@gmail.com by the 15th of the month. If you need to speak directly to Gary: 970-689-2512. Please include at least the following information in your email:

  • Date, location and time of event, and which time zone the event is in. Details about the event—what’s it all about?
  • Background information about the speaker or event. Is the event free? If there is a charge, how much?
  • Name of the organization sponsoring or hosting the event. If it is an online event, how does a person get the link?
  • If possible, a link to a website that has more info. Or the email address or phone number of a person who someone can contact for more information about the event.
  • If possible, a photograph or artwork about the event. A photo of a speaker, for example, will suffice. Or a photo from the event in a previous year.

The calendar is published on the first day of the month and covers the upcoming three months. The calendar is developed and distributed by the Lewis and Clark Trail Heritage Foundation. For learning about and keeping up with Lewis and Clark, join the Lewis and Clark Trail Heritage Foundation. Membership is very affordable. Here’s how to join…

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